Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
MSNBCW 6
CNNW 4
CSPAN 4
KQED (PBS) 4
CSPAN2 3
FBC 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
WJLA (ABC) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
CNBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 42
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
offer access to everything from education to health care to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that your harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in dc. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our h history, the belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i have come here to talk about today. over the last two months washington has been dominated by some fairly contention debates, and between a reckless shoutdown by congressional republicans, and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these last few months, so it's not surprising that the american's people's frustrations with washington are at an all-time high. but we know the people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. the frustration is rooted in their own daily battles. to make ends meet, pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hard they work the deck is st
home offer access to everything from education, to health care, to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history -- a belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months. so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all- time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles -- to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for
. you picked the passion, education. this wonderful line is when you were in high school, a tough neighborhood in north phillie, where we grew up, irish somehow, black, and very tough, and it's a tough rundown neighborhood, the whole place, and you were talking to the kids, african-american kids there, wondering why you are the highest paid writer in the world, you tried to get their interest, right way to do it, i think. i'm more me than they are them. explain that about your success as a writer that you're more yourself than most people are themselves, or at least you delve deeper into what that is and how that took you to education as a passion. >> some of them were excited, some were not, trying to be provocative, so i said something provocative. i said, word for word, i'm the highest paid writer in the world, and they sat up. okay. all the teachers in the back stood up too. i said, why is that? how do you think that happened? they said, luck? yes, that's possible, luck's involved for sure, and they said, you know somebody? actually, no, we're all indians, no, we don't know an
.79. >>> a bad report card on american education. test scores show american students continue to lag in international rankings. according to results from the program for international student assessment, u.s. teenagers ranked below average in math and near average in reading and science. trailing behind countries like japan and china where students of the same age continue to maintain top scores. can this be fixed and what does this mean for businesses and america's competitiveness. here to discuss this, michelle, former chancellor of the public schools in washington d.c. and the ceo and founder of students first. michelle, we're happy to have you. you're such an education expert. let me start with the first question, can this be fixed? because just about every ceo tyler and i talk to are very worried about u.s. competitiveness and, you know, where will they get top talent in the workplace if our kids in school just aren't doing well? do you think? >> it can absolutely be fixed. i hear the same thing from business folks saying they can't find people in the applicant pool that have th
there. he'll be talking about education policy. [inaudible conversations] >> hey, good afternoon, everyone. we're going to go ahead and get started. hey, how you doing this afternoon? i'm rick hess, director of education policy studies here at the american enterprise institute. happy to welcome all of you to join us today for this promising and, i think, intriguing conversation with connecticut governor dan malloy. delighted to have those of you who are here with us and also those of you watching at home either via live stream or on c-span2. the hashtag for the event is hashtag ct ed reform, that's capital ct ed reform. feel free to follow along or join in. we are going to be going for an hour, until 2:30. format's going to be pretty straightforward. first, governor malloy, dan malloy of connecticut, has been kind enough to agree to share some thoughts on the dos and don'ts of school reform in connecticut, what are some of the lessons they've learned as they have tackled this work. i'm going to then have an opportunity to chat with the governor for 15 or 20 minutes, ask him a cou
education to health care to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history. the belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. now, over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates. i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months, so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all-time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustrations rooted in their own daily battles, to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense
educate. he was the most educated candidate they ever had to try to move voters to a new place. >> you mentioned the learning. and gay mcdougall, you campaigned to release him from prison. he used the time in prison to be educated as well. >> absolutely. he used it to be educated and educated the other prisoners. he called it the university of robben island. they spent time learning about political development around the world. they decided who they, as a political party and as, you know, activists, wanted to be. the decisionmaking. when they finally emerged, from that prison, they knew exactly the road they wanted to travel. >> and jendayi frazer, he was conscious of his role as educator when he became president and after he left office as well. didn't often hide disappointment in what was going on in south africa and other african nations. >> yes, he certainly was. i think president mandela, what i took from him was the courage of his convictions. he was very clear when he did not agree. he would do that privately and publicly. for instance, on the issue of hiv and aids, he certainly
that is done here. and all the non-profits that call the arc home offer access to everything from education to health care to the safe shelter from the streets. which means you're harnessing the power of community. to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your reflects the tradition that run through our history. the blood vessel we're greater together than on our own. over the last two months washington has been dominated by some contentious debates. i think it's fair to say. and between a reckless shut down by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admitly poor execution on my administration's part on implementing the latest stage of the new law. it's not surprising the frustrations with the are at the all-time high. we know the frustrations run deeper than the most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles fop make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hay work, the deck stacked against them. it's rooted in the fear they kids w
locally grown meals and giving us hands on education opportunities that helps make lasting changes in the school's food environment. >> welcome back. what you're looking at is a video from the national farm to school network. the organization estimates more than 10,000 schools across the country participate in the program. it's one of several innovative ideas that school systems are using to get kids excited about healthy eating. waj, i'm looking at the tweets coming in, and just before the break, julie was saying give control back to the lunch lady. this needs to go back and go local. >> yes, we should make the #empower the lunch lady go survival. viral. >> jean, waj raise as interesting point. when i was in school, the lunch ladies pretty much prepared everything from scratch on site on the premise. now there is heat and serve. why the flip? >> years ago there were considerable cuts to our program. that moved people away from scratch cooking. you're seeing more school districts going to scratch cooking. a lot of that is driven by the regulations to reduce sodium, to reduce fat, t
. if you want to get ahead in our country is through education. so many people in our big cities are being short changed by a bad school system. we want to make it better through competition, by giving every kid the choice. part of our economic freedom zones is that federal money that comes to detroit isn't going to the school system directly but to the kid and their parents and each parent will decide which school they want to take their money to. >> it's a plan that touches regulation and education as well. >> absolutely. >> obama care, all over the news recent obviously for obvious reasons. we had heard this week that fox news was reporting that senator harry reid exempted some of his staff from signing up for obama care. have you signed up and how was that experience for you? >> don't get me started. i'm still in a bad mood from doing that. i spent two hours on wednesday doing it. i had all of my information in, all of my most personal information so i hope they're not hacking into this from all over the country. i put all my information in and then i pushed the button to sign up for a
and that education is something that is available to all that we walk towards more pros spert pore young people in the country. when president obama was here a few short months ago, he talked about the ways it has the potential to be an after our strengths are linked to one another. i think that's the best way to memorialize all that he meant to us. >> we know december 15th is when will be the final good-bye, if that's appropriate to say, we'll see each other again, but the final good-bye here. i can't imagine there won't be a television set or radio on where people will gather and watch this moment that will be unmatched as far as the diversity and the range of people who sincerely say that this man changed their life, set the compass of their direction in life. >> that's so true, tamron. during the anti-apartheid moment, we used to chant all the time, the whole world is watching, here again he has made certain that the world world is watching, everyone is pausing and reflecting on what this man meant to us all. we count ourselves blessed to have lived in the shadow of his grace all of these y
a wage when they're trying to earn a living. as we have more older and highly educated people in that sector. >> if you had a perfect system in a test tube, though, and it's not that way, it just seems to me, if you can find someone not working that is willing to work at whatever the market price is, you can fill enough jobs that you want, it seems like, you know, if you're true to economics, it seems like you would never set anything. you'd want the market. >> this is an idea that says -- >> and the other thing, jared, is it not this simple? a company can either have 100 people at $8 an hour or 80 people at $10 an hour. >> it's definitely not that simple. let me respond to both of those. i thought it was gary who gave a good list of the way that minimum wages -- the increases tend to get absorbed. and that's why, joe, your second point i think is wrong. he talked about profits, he talked about prices. there's also efficiency gains. clearly, the absorption mechanism isn't just on the employment margin. that's why we get those results i've been describing through our discussion
as a resource and not a cost. education and training must therefore be looked at very closely to ensure that we empower the workers, raise productivity levels and meet the skills needs of a modern economy. important work will have to be done in and significant resources devoted to the areas of science and technology, including research and development. government is also convinced that organised labour is an important partner whose cooperation is crucial for the reconstruction and development of our country. that partnership requires, amongst other things, that our labour law be reformed so that it is in line with international standards, apartheid vestiges are removed and a more harmonious labour relations dispensation is created, on the basis of tripartite cooperation between government, labour and capital. the government is determined forcefully to confront the scourge of unemployment, not by way of handouts but by the creation of work opportunities. the government will also deal sensitively with the issue of population movements into the country, to protect our workers, to guard against the
cahealth care a education, we're still in it but it's just changed phases. >> one of the things that has to change, and one of the things professor ogletree said about him being a patriot, it is a much different world then than it is now. the great cold war was on at that time and the south african government was aligned with the united states. and people who were seeing that struggle were seeing the south african government as an ally of the united states and not paying enough attention to the big human rights issues. but the big issue going forward now is president zuma in south africa now and does he get the lessons from the life and leadership of president mandela and other leaders in africa, and not just that continent but around the world that they can take something away from that. there are not going to be a lot of people dancing in the streets because they're mourning the loss of mugabwe, for example, next door, but i hope the lesson this week and the days to come, that people will see the real value of the kind of leadership that was not self-centered and it was not based on di
was in some ways accidentally privileged by being able to get a missionary education, and he started out life essentially with a tremendous sense of self-confidence inspired by his local community. and to take him from that position which makes him an aspiring lawyer, by his early 30s he's already rising the ranks of the anc only marks the ways in which he evolved as an individual. and i think we have to hold that in place because he lived so long that he was able to draw on so many strains of thought. so, yes, he went through a period where he embraced africanism or black nationalism to a point where the notion of race first many the tradition of a marcus garvey in the united states, for example, this notion that black people have to solidify. and yes, the anc, there was tension there. >> such a great point, he lives to be nearly 100 years old. his trajectory for change is very different from that of a king who was assassinated while still a young man. one quick question then more after the break. not only do we misremember mandela, we misremember ourselves in relationship to mandela. we now
and schools were built so that now kids, including her son, can have an education. alex? >> that's a great story too. you've got so many from there, michelle. very quickly, the memorial tuesday, because of the enormity of that stadium in which it's going to be held s that the one that is being more focused upon and also given all the world leaders that are expected to attend, that over the funeral on sunday next week? >> reporter: it does require logistical planning. however, i will say the state funeral, which is going to be big, is in a remote village, his hometown. so people are going to have to get there. that's going to be a difficult process as well. that is expected to be huge because it's really going to be the last step in this mourning process. world leaders, some of them, we don't know exactly who yet, are expected to attend that as well. but all of this has had that sense of importance, this outpouring. just standing out here, you know, these beautiful, spontaneous songs will break out. the entire crowd joins in or just walking down a street. you walk by someone and they're jus
educated, sophisticated man. he knew white south africa, black south africa, poor south africa, wealthy south africa. one of his supporters said at the time when they were looking for a leader for this mass movement, in walks this six foot two inch massive demand. they said, yup, he is the one. mandela said at one of his first meetings, he stood in the room with the elders and said, i will be the first black president of south africa. he said that in the 1950s. >> and in south africa in recent line, what it was like to up in 1994, that first election. they still had tears in their eyes, still very vivid to them. legacy ofd that the nelson mandela would not be enough, that there was still a lot of work to be done in south africa. the country has problems. it is one of the leading places of rape in the country, aids is rampant. unemployment between the ages of 20 and 50 is more than 50%. but nelson mandela set the stage for the future. of them,t out the best this kind and gentle man. he always made the point, people ask, is he still angry, he said i am still angry but i made a choice. i d
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
was familiar with howard and the extent to which howard had anticipated in african education the same as the university of ft. hayre has participated in african education in east and central africa. that was a very smooth relationship for the two universities and i went there as a result set up an office, howard university, to help put in place collaboration between our university and university at howard. the bottom line of that was that we at howard established what we call the south african research and archive al project to study the anti-apartheid movement in the united states. >> dr. harris, what would you say is the legacy, the dual legacy, of nelson mandela both in south africa and in this country? and i guess i'm asking that specificically because you sort of had a bird's eye view of what he was able to do in the country and what he was able to create by extension, by reaching out to howard university to say we want there to be some role here in what happens with south africa going forward. >> well, we were very excited when he came because everyone knew about him. in respons
now. >>> when it comes to our educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. the woman who turned around the dc school system knows how to fix it. michelle ree is up next. >>> martin bashir resigns after making disgusting comments about sarah palin. she's here to respond for the first time on tv. you'll see it only on "fox & friends" in about a half hour >>> the answer to the aflac trivia question, frankie muniz. the winner is jill from georgia. she'll get a copy of "george washington's secret six" which i will sign and we will send. >>> when it comes to educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. >> just take a look at the latest test results. we have american students, they didn't make the top five for reading, in fact, they fell to 17th overall. >> when it comes to science, we came in 21st. >> the worst of all, math, where american students ranked 26. >> right. so why do our students keep ahe? michelle ree is the founder of students first and former chancellor of dc's public schools. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> certainly
said, okay, and then she said, well, that's good, that's a nice education, you know, for literature and things like that. and i said, no, i believe it. and she sort of said, okay. >> the reactions to your piece and whether it surprised you. >> very positive. yeah, i was surprised. i got so many e-mails. i even heard from some of my friends who are atheists who were interested in it and appreciated it and were inspired by it. so, yeah, i was really welcome and a nice response. >> kirsten powers. still to come, our news december income new york standing by to give you the latest on that deadly train derailment in the bronx. >>> in the meantime, check out our show's facebook page. we're constantly posting content and having conversations there. >>> up next, why fake twitter followers has become a big business. and how one newspaper is combining journalism and marijuana. >>> if you're in this business, you like to have as many viewers as possible. if you're on twitter, you want to have as many followers as possible. but it turns out millions of these twitter accounts are, well, fake. cr
cuts and democrats want to restore educational money and medical sesearch. how they would pay for it. and the republicans are not happy about the spending and bill written behind closed doors. >> paul ryan came in and gave us an update and i hope they work it out. there is cleel no agreement. >> no agreement and the senate is still out on the thanks giving recess and will not be back until next week. and then the house goes on vacation for the week. it leaves only five work days in which the house and senate will be in the capitol building together. and the budget is not only the problem. there is a desput over the farm bill and if they don't fix it. dairy subsidies will expire. and they deal with a defense authorization bill and that is green light to pay the military next year and ongoing battle that democrats are trying to extend unemployment benefits. and yet the benefits are extended four years in a row and a lot of republicans that it are scaling that back. look for a lot of cans to get kicked down the road and look for a shutdown. >> they better not take a lunch break. >> five
, not intended to be this way, we prefer to have him with us. i'd like to believe that movie is going to educate the next generation about the importance of this man. maybe never get a chance to make the difference with nelson mandela, but you can make a difference just in your street, your school, maybe in your community somewhere, maybe in your organization. every single one of us have an opportunity to make a difference. that's what mandela taught us. >> he certainly did. chris dodd, thank you for joining us. >> thank you both. >> thank you, senator. our coverage will continue on the passing of nelson mandela in south africa. we'll be right back on >>> back to live pictures in johannesburg, singing outside of nelson mandela's home where he passed away this afternoon. that announcement coming an hour and 20 minutes ago. president obama commenting about a half hour ago saying he personally drew inspiration from his life, studied his words. he protested it. a man who took history in his hands. >>> d.c. mayor vincent gray extended his deepest sympathies saying mandela's diplomacy and dedication t
understand stood what sort of man mandela was, respected him, listened to him, were eddie educated by him. that was a powerful message no a young college student about this person who went on to become president of stojakovic. >> any recollection of affect that mandela has had on american politics? >> i think the president will speak to that in just a short time. the question that the first african-american president certainly watched what happened with nelson mandela in stojakovic. it had had.tory it has had an affect on politics here, the anti-apartheid movement, to pass sanctions here in congress, the debate that took place here in the united states over constructive engagement. >> also the withdrawal of u.s. investment dollars to companies that did business with the apartheid regime? >> absolutely. there were some companies facing some very tough decisions at that time. and we have a lot of discussion about sanctions ever since. that is going to be part of nelson mandela's history. the legacy not just in south africa, but in this country as well. >> as far as u.s. politics go, when ne
, health care and education to all citizens. what has been happening the last five years? exactly what this 3457b claims to want. >> i just read a great book by a guy named john mackey who founded whole foods called conscious capitalism. he says the same thing as the pope. he says we all have to eat to live. but that doesn't mean we live just to eat. we all think we have a higher purpose and that in business, business can't exist without profit but does that mean that business only exists to profit? why do we all work? we work to take care of those we love and provide a little security and to make the best we can out of ourselves. that's what the pope is saying. this is not an anticapitalist creed. the pope reinforced the principle of catholic, the idea that you push -- >> but with that term, social justice raises red flags. >> the term "social justice" has been used to justify big, dumb, top-down government that has ruined a lot of people, a welfare system -- one of the causes of inequality, it's not the unbridled capitalism it's the end of the american family that started in the earl
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. it's donut friday at the office. aso every friday morning they psend me out to get the goods. but what they don't know is that i'm using my citi thankyou card at the coffee shop, so i get 2 times the points. and those points add up fast. so, sure, make me the grunt. 'cause i'll be using those points to help me get to a beach in miami. and allllllll the big shots will be stuck here at the cube farm. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards >>> i'm milissa rehberger. a union official says the engineer of a train that derailed in new york caught himself nodding off just before a sharp curve. >>> a federal judge says detroit can declare bankruptcy. it allows detroit to cut employee pensions. lawmakers in illinois passed a bill overhauling the state's pension system which is $100 billion in debt. the measure in part cuts benefits to workers and retirees. back to "hardball." ♪ >>> welcome back to "hardball." after the republi
a permanent partnership between , for the and africans education of our children, for the solution of our problems, for the resolution of our differences, for the elevation of what is best about us all. that is what we owe to nelson and her to amy beal family, and to all of those who have sacrificed. for those 10,000 long days and the shiny example sent the clear understanding that a man who has given up so much of his life can give us that even more important than the sacrificed yesterday is what you are doing with today and what you will do with tomorrow. for that is the thing that always humbles me when i am with nelson mandela, the sense of serenity and peace and engagement in the moment. we so i say to all of you should not waste our day is. we should make more of our days. mr. mandela waited a very long time to actually do something for his people rather than just to be something to keep their hearts and hopes alive. and every day i watch him, that is what he does. so should we. in forgiving those who imprisoned him, he reminded us of the most fundamental end,n of all, that in the a
was trying to bring a revolution to my country and educate my own people about democracy and freedom and i hadn't been able to do that to my wife or my mother and he felt that was a lack, and they just went their separate ways and it was a sad situation. >> rose: and then there was. >> then he met win any, and when you see pictures of when any, just a gorgeous woman, full of strength and pride and. >> rose: she was an activist? >> an activist in her own right and what happened was at that particular moment in time, the two of them just clicked and became such an indelible force but with the celebration of all the documentation on mandela being imprisoned 27 years, you know, a lot of times credit is not given to what winney had to endure because those early years of prison, they would go up to the house 2:00 o'clock in the morning and shake her down, strip search her, i.an those two girls were 3 and 1, four and two, and, you know, a lot of people don't remember that you talk about courage and strength, i mean she was in solitary confinement for 18 months, winny, but after 27 years in prison
made up of older professionals, working married couples, and educated singles usually make at least six figures a year during other periods which is in the top 20% of earners. frank and michelle? >> okay, wendy. well the world will have a new biggest airline today, right? >> it's going to be in the u.s.. american airlines will merge with u.s. airways when their deal goes through later today. the government had tried to block the merger. the deal will lift american airlines out of bankruptcy protection. >> okay, wendy, live in new york, thank you. >>> well morning commuters are facing an icy ride across the mid atlantic this morning. more on the impact of the blast of winter weather. >>> researchers have found an easy way to kill bed bugs. how to deal with the blood sucking pests. ,,,,,,,,,, avo: the volkswagen "sign then drive" sales event is back. which means it's never been easier to get a new 2014 jetta. it gets an impressive 34 highway mpg and comes with no charge scheduled maintenance. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. sign. then drive. get z
people across the country will be thinking of our children and educators. so tragically taken from us. and wondering how to help. we ask that you consider performing an can the an of kindness or volunteering with a charitable organization in your own local community. we hope that some small pressure of good may be returned to the world. this concludes our family statement. i'd like to add that our family will be lighting a candle on the eve of 12/14, the last night we spent with our sweet charlotte. >> and we will be lighting a candle for our beautiful little girl jessica. >> we will be lighting a candle on behalf jessie mccord louis. >> we're going to light a candle in honor of our daughter emily. >> we will light a candle for my mom dawn. >> we will light a candle for my older sister, victoria. >> we will be lighting a candle for my sweet boy jack. >> we will be lighting a candle in honor of our beautiful girl grace. >> we will be lighting a candle for our gorgeous daughter avile. >> we'll be lighting a candle for our beautiful daughter anna [ speaking foreign language ] >> we will
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. when you do what i do, iyou think about risk.. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >> up next steve rattner will be here and former governor ed rendell joins the conversation. "morning joe" is
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. you give them the giggles. tylenol cold® helps relieve your worst cold and flu symptoms. but for everything we do, we know you do so much more. tylenol cold®. and our giant idaho potato truck is still missing. so my dog and i we're going to go find it. it's out there somewhere spreading the good word about idaho potatoes and raising money for meals on wheels. but we'd really like our truck back, so if you see it, let us know, would you? thanks. what? you can fill that box and pay one flat rate. how naughty was he? oh boy... [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. simple, flat rate shipping with the reliability of fedex. [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. waffle bars... fancy robes... seems every hotel has something to love... so join the loyalty program that lets you earn free nights in any of them. plus, for a limited time, members can win a free night every day. only at hotels.com >>> welcome back to "new day." when it comes to terrorism we are less safe today than a year ago. that's not some o
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)